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Influenza and Respiratory Care

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 182: Co-infection with Influenza Viruses and Influenza-Like Virus During the 2015/2016 Epidemic Season
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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6 Mendeley
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Chapter title
Co-infection with Influenza Viruses and Influenza-Like Virus During the 2015/2016 Epidemic Season
Chapter number 182
Book title
Influenza and Respiratory Care
Published in
Advances in experimental medicine and biology, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/5584_2016_182
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-951711-7, 978-3-31-951712-4
Authors

K. Szymański, K. Cieślak, D. Kowalczyk, L.B. Brydak, Szymański, K., Cieślak, K., Kowalczyk, D., Brydak, L.B.

Abstract

Concerning viral infection of the respiratory system, a single virus can cause a variety of clinical symptoms and the same set of symptoms can be caused by different viruses. Moreover, infection is often caused by a combination of viruses acting at the same time. The present study demonstrates, using multiplex RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR, that in the 2015/2016 influenza season, co-infections were confirmed in patients aged 1 month to 90 years. We found 73 co-infections involving influenza viruses, 17 involving influenza viruses and influenza-like viruses, and six involving influenza-like viruses. The first type of co-infections above mentioned was the most common, amounting to 51 cases, with type A and B viruses occurring simultaneously. There also were four cases of co-infections with influenza virus A/H1N1/pdm09 and A/H1N1/ subtypes and two cases with A/H1N1/pdm09 and A/H3N2/ subtypes. The 2015/2016 epidemic season was characterized by a higher number of confirmed co-infections compared with the previous seasons. Infections by more than one respiratory virus were most often found in children and in individuals aged over 65.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 1 17%
Student > Master 1 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 17%
Neuroscience 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2020.
All research outputs
#9,211,819
of 14,634,925 outputs
Outputs from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#1,467
of 3,363 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,312
of 274,595 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in experimental medicine and biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,634,925 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,363 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,595 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them