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Potential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 1999
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources

Citations

dimensions_citation
328 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
165 Mendeley
Title
Potential effects of gas hydrate on human welfare
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 1999
DOI 10.1073/pnas.96.7.3420
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. A. Kvenvolden

Abstract

For almost 30 years. serious interest has been directed toward natural gas hydrate, a crystalline solid composed of water and methane, as a potential (i) energy resource, (ii) factor in global climate change, and (iii) submarine geohazard. Although each of these issues can affect human welfare, only (iii) is considered to be of immediate importance. Assessments of gas hydrate as an energy resource have often been overly optimistic, based in part on its very high methane content and on its worldwide occurrence in continental margins. Although these attributes are attractive, geologic settings, reservoir properties, and phase-equilibria considerations diminish the energy resource potential of natural gas hydrate. The possible role of gas hydrate in global climate change has been often overstated. Although methane is a "greenhouse" gas in the atmosphere, much methane from dissociated gas hydrate may never reach the atmosphere, but rather may be converted to carbon dioxide and sequestered by the hydrosphere/biosphere before reaching the atmosphere. Thus, methane from gas hydrate may have little opportunity to affect global climate change. However, submarine geohazards (such as sediment instabilities and slope failures on local and regional scales, leading to debris flows, slumps, slides, and possible tsunamis) caused by gas-hydrate dissociation are of immediate and increasing importance as humankind moves to exploit seabed resources in ever-deepening waters of coastal oceans. The vulnerability of gas hydrate to temperature and sea level changes enhances the instability of deep-water oceanic sediments, and thus human activities and installations in this setting can be affected.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 165 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
United Kingdom 3 2%
Canada 2 1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Jamaica 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 151 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 27%
Researcher 30 18%
Student > Master 30 18%
Student > Bachelor 14 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 7%
Other 27 16%
Unknown 9 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 64 39%
Engineering 30 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 8%
Environmental Science 12 7%
Social Sciences 8 5%
Other 22 13%
Unknown 16 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2011.
All research outputs
#2,252,700
of 12,733,544 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#28,951
of 78,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,047
of 277,958 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#511
of 943 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,733,544 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 78,537 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,958 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 943 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.