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The respiratory system in varanid lizards: determinants of O2 transfer

Overview of attention for article published in Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology, October 2002
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Title
The respiratory system in varanid lizards: determinants of O2 transfer
Published in
Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology, October 2002
DOI 10.1016/s1095-6433(02)00147-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter B Frappell, Timothy J Schultz, Keith A Christian

Abstract

Varanids in general exhibit greater aerobic capacities than other lizards. In a similar approach to the extensive investigations undertaken in mammals, the respiratory system in varanids is examined in terms of oxygen transfer from the air to the blood during rest and sustained locomotory activity. The parameters controlling the transfer of O(2) through the various steps of the respiratory system are appropriate to meet the maximum demands for oxygen with one possible exception, circulatory convection. Ventilatory convection is maintained during maximal aerobic locomotion ensuring adequate pulmonary ventilation and the protection of alveolar P(O(2)). Little evidence exists to indicate a mechanically imposed constraint to breathe and the possibility of a gular pump acting to assist ventilation, as a general feature of varanids remains to be determined. Alterations in the relative contributions of the ventilation-perfusion ratio, pulmonary diffusion, diffusion equilibrium and right-left shunts preserved the alveolar-arterial P(O(2)) difference, ensuring that arterial oxygenation was maintained. In those species where increases in cardiac output were limited, maximum O(2) transfer was achieved through increased extraction of oxygen at the tissues. Overall, the interrelationship of adjacent steps in the respiratory system ensures that one step cannot become limiting. Compensatory changes occur in various parameters to offset those parameters that are 'limited'. The high aerobic activity of varanid lizards would not be achievable without a compensated circulatory convection.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 7%
Brazil 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 26 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 30%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Other 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 83%
Unspecified 2 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2015.
All research outputs
#10,880,604
of 12,276,818 outputs
Outputs from Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology
#579
of 704 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,549
of 271,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Comparative Biochemistry & Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology
#22
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,276,818 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 704 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,554 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.