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Associations between surface markers on blood monocytes and carotid atherosclerosis in HIV-positive individuals

Overview of attention for article published in Immunology & Cell Biology, December 2013
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Title
Associations between surface markers on blood monocytes and carotid atherosclerosis in HIV-positive individuals
Published in
Immunology & Cell Biology, December 2013
DOI 10.1038/icb.2013.84
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clare L V Westhorpe, Anna Maisa, Tim Spelman, Jennifer F Hoy, Elizabeth M Dewar, Sofie Karapanagiotidis, Anna C Hearps, Wan-Jung Cheng, Janine Trevillyan, Sharon R Lewin, Dmitri Sviridov, Julian H Elliott, Anthony Jaworowski, Anthony M Dart, Suzanne M Crowe

Abstract

Chronic HIV infection is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including in patients with virological suppression. Persistent innate immune activation may contribute to the development of CVD via activation of monocytes in these patients. We investigated whether changes in monocyte phenotype predict subclinical atherosclerosis in virologically suppressed HIV-positive individuals with low cardiovascular risk. We enroled 51 virologically suppressed HIV-positive individuals not receiving protease inhibitors or statins and 49 age-matched uninfected controls in this study. Carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT) was used as a surrogate marker for CVD, and traditional risk factors, including Framingham risk scores, were recorded. Markers of monocyte activation (CD14, CD16, CCR2, CX3CR1, CD38, HLA-DR and CD11b) were measured in whole-blood samples by flow cytometry. Associations were assessed using univariate and multivariate median regressions. Median cIMT was similar between HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants (P=0.3), although HIV-positive patients had significantly higher Framingham risk score (P=0.009) and systemic inflammation. Expression of two monocyte markers, CD11b and CX3CR1, independently predicted carotid artery thickness in HIV-positive individuals after controlling for Framingham risk score (P=0.025 and 0.015, respectively). These markers were not predictive of carotid artery thickening in controls. Our study indicates that monocyte surface markers may serve as novel predictors of CVD in HIV-positive individuals and is consistent with an important role for monocyte activation in the progression of HIV-related cardiovascular pathology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 60 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Researcher 9 15%
Unspecified 7 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 10%
Other 18 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Unspecified 6 10%
Other 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2015.
All research outputs
#10,948,228
of 12,354,360 outputs
Outputs from Immunology & Cell Biology
#1,114
of 1,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,398
of 270,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Immunology & Cell Biology
#56
of 56 outputs
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