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bcpmr1 encodes a P-type Ca 2+ /Mn 2+ -ATPase mediating cell-wall integrity and virulence in the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea

Overview of attention for article published in Fungal Genetics & Biology, March 2015
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Title
bcpmr1 encodes a P-type Ca 2+ /Mn 2+ -ATPase mediating cell-wall integrity and virulence in the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea
Published in
Fungal Genetics & Biology, March 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.fgb.2015.01.012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Verónica Plaza, Yanssuy Lagües, Mauro Carvajal, Luis A. Pérez-García, Hector M. Mora-Montes, Paulo Canessa, Luis F. Larrondo, Luis Castillo

Abstract

The cell wall of fungi is generally composed of an inner skeletal layer consisting of various polysaccharides surrounded by a layer of glycoproteins. These usually contain both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides, coupled to the proteins by stepwise addition of mannose residues by mannosyltransferases in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In yeast, an essential luminal cofactor for these mannosyltransferases is Mn(2+) provided by the Ca(2+)/Mn(2+)-ATPase known as Pmr1. In this study, we have identified and characterized the B. cinerea pmr1 gene, the closest homolog of yeast PMR1. We hypothesized that bcpmr1 also encodes a Ca(2+)/Mn(2+)-ATPase that plays an important role in the protein glycosylation pathway. Phenotypic analysis showed that bcpmr1 null mutants displayed a significant reduction in conidial production, radial growth and diameter of sclerotia. Significant alterations in hyphal cell wall composition were observed including a 83% decrease of mannan levels and an increase in the amount of chitin and glucan. These changes were accompanied by a hypersensitivity to cell wall-perturbing agents such as Calcofluor white, Congo red and zymolyase. Importantly, the Δbcpmr1 mutant showed reduced virulence in tomato (leafs and fruits) and apple (fruits) and reduced biofilm formation. Together, our results highlight the importance of bcpmr1 for protein glycosylation, cell wall structure and virulence of B. cinerea.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Master 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Unspecified 2 9%
Other 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 18%
Unspecified 2 9%
Chemistry 2 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2015.
All research outputs
#9,360,940
of 12,196,966 outputs
Outputs from Fungal Genetics & Biology
#549
of 762 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#175,882
of 276,169 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fungal Genetics & Biology
#17
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,196,966 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 762 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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