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Longer and more frequent marine heatwaves over the past century

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#30 of 23,820)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
122 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
561 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
314 Mendeley
Title
Longer and more frequent marine heatwaves over the past century
Published in
Nature Communications, April 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-03732-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric C. J. Oliver, Markus G. Donat, Michael T. Burrows, Pippa J. Moore, Dan A. Smale, Lisa V. Alexander, Jessica A. Benthuysen, Ming Feng, Alex Sen Gupta, Alistair J. Hobday, Neil J. Holbrook, Sarah E. Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Hillary A. Scannell, Sandra C. Straub, Thomas Wernberg

Abstract

Heatwaves are important climatic extremes in atmospheric and oceanic systems that can have devastating and long-term impacts on ecosystems, with subsequent socioeconomic consequences. Recent prominent marine heatwaves have attracted considerable scientific and public interest. Despite this, a comprehensive assessment of how these ocean temperature extremes have been changing globally is missing. Using a range of ocean temperature data including global records of daily satellite observations, daily in situ measurements and gridded monthly in situ-based data sets, we identify significant increases in marine heatwaves over the past century. We find that from 1925 to 2016, global average marine heatwave frequency and duration increased by 34% and 17%, respectively, resulting in a 54% increase in annual marine heatwave days globally. Importantly, these trends can largely be explained by increases in mean ocean temperatures, suggesting that we can expect further increases in marine heatwave days under continued global warming.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 561 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 314 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 314 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 62 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 59 19%
Student > Master 53 17%
Unspecified 42 13%
Student > Bachelor 39 12%
Other 59 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 86 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 82 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 67 21%
Unspecified 57 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 3%
Other 14 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1376. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,901
of 13,395,281 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#30
of 23,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109
of 271,046 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,395,281 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 23,820 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,046 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them