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The synaptic pathology of α-synuclein aggregation in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson’s disease and Parkinson’s disease dementia

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica, June 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
272 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
414 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The synaptic pathology of α-synuclein aggregation in dementia with Lewy bodies, Parkinson’s disease and Parkinson’s disease dementia
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica, June 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00401-010-0711-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Walter J. Schulz-Schaeffer

Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are usually associated with loss of dopaminergic neurons. Loss of substantia nigra neurons and presence of Lewy body inclusions in some of the remaining neurons are the hallmark pathology seen in the final stages of the disease. Attempts to correlate Lewy body pathology to either cell death or severity of clinical symptoms, however, have not been successful. While the pathophysiology of the neurodegenerative process can hardly be explained by Lewy bodies, the clinical symptoms do indicate a degenerative process located at the presynapse resulting in a neurotransmitter deficiency. Recently it was shown that 90% or even more of alpha-synuclein aggregates in DLB cases were located at the presynapses in the form of very small deposits. In parallel, dendritic spines are retracted, whereas the presynapses are relatively preserved, suggesting a neurotransmitter deprivation. The same alpha-synuclein pathology can be demonstrated for PD. These findings give rise to the notion that not cell death but rather alpha-synuclein aggregate-related synaptic dysfunction causes the neurodegeneration. This opens new perspectives for understanding PD and DLB. If presynaptic alpha-synuclein aggregation, not neuronal loss, is the key issue of the neurodegenerative process, then PD and DLB may eventually be treatable in the future. The disease may progress via trans-synaptical spread, suggesting that stem cell transplants are of limited use. Future therapies may focus on the regeneration of synapses.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 414 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 6 1%
United States 4 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 393 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 99 24%
Researcher 72 17%
Student > Bachelor 69 17%
Student > Master 65 16%
Unspecified 25 6%
Other 84 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 128 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 83 20%
Neuroscience 65 16%
Unspecified 42 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 8%
Other 61 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2019.
All research outputs
#1,506,180
of 13,495,245 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica
#364
of 1,687 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,402
of 282,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica
#8
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,495,245 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,687 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,319 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.