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Nanomaterials in the Environment: Behavior, Fate, Bioavailability, and Effects-An Updated Review

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
249 Mendeley
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Title
Nanomaterials in the Environment: Behavior, Fate, Bioavailability, and Effects-An Updated Review
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, April 2018
DOI 10.1002/etc.4147
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jamie R. Lead, Graeme E. Batley, Pedro J.J. Alvarez, Marie‐Noële Croteau, Richard D. Handy, Michael J. McLaughlin, Jonathan D Judy, Kristin Schirmer, Lead, Jamie R., Batley, Graeme E., Alvarez, Pedro J.J., Croteau, Marie-Noele, Handy, Richard D., McLaughlin, Michael J., Judy, Jonathon D., Schirmer, Kristin, Croteau, Marie-Noële, Judy, Jonathan D, Pedro J. J. Alvarez, Jonathan D. Judy

Abstract

This review covers developments in studies of nanomaterials (NMs) in the environment, since the much-cited review of Klaine et al. (2008). It discusses novel insights on fate and behavior, metrology, transformations, bioavailability, toxicity mechanisms and environmental impacts, with a focus on terrestrial and aquatic systems. Overall the findings were that: i) despite the substantial developments, there remain critical gaps, in large part due to the lack of analytical, modelling and field capabilities and in part due to the breadth and complexity of the area; ii) a key knowledge gap is the lack of data on environmental concentrations and dosimetry generally; iii) there is substantial evidence that there are nano-specific effects (different from both ions and larger particles) in the environment in terms of fate, bioavailability and toxicity, but this is not consistent for all NMs, species and all relevant processes; iv) a paradigm is emerging that NMs are less toxic than equivalent dissolved materials but more toxic than the corresponding bulk materials; v) translation of incompletely understood science into regulation and policy continues to be challenging. There is a developing consensus that NMs may pose a relatively low environmental risk, however, with the uncertainty and lack of data in many areas, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn. In addition, this emerging consensus will likely change rapidly with qualitative changes in the technology and increased future discharges. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 249 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 240 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 63 25%
Researcher 46 18%
Student > Master 31 12%
Student > Bachelor 21 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 4%
Other 41 16%
Unknown 36 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 62 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 18%
Chemistry 26 10%
Engineering 15 6%
Materials Science 10 4%
Other 34 14%
Unknown 56 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2018.
All research outputs
#3,139,856
of 13,583,786 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#598
of 3,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,049
of 271,145 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#6
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,583,786 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,918 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,145 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.