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Methane in groundwater from a leaking gas well, Piceance Basin, Colorado, USA

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, September 2018
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2 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Methane in groundwater from a leaking gas well, Piceance Basin, Colorado, USA
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, September 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.03.371
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter B. McMahon, Judith C. Thomas, John T. Crawford, Mark M. Dornblaser, Andrew G. Hunt

Abstract

Site-specific and regional analysis of time-series hydrologic and geochemical data collected from 15 monitoring wells in the Piceance Basin indicated that a leaking gas well contaminated shallow groundwater with thermogenic methane. The gas well was drilled in 1956 and plugged and abandoned in 1990. Chemical and isotopic data showed the thermogenic methane was not from mixing of gas-rich formation water with shallow groundwater or natural migration of a free-gas phase. Water-level and methane-isotopic data, and video logs from a deep monitoring well, indicated that a shale confining layer ~125m below the zone of contamination was an effective barrier to upward migration of water and gas. The gas well, located 27m from the contaminated monitoring well, had ~1000m of uncemented annular space behind production casing that was the likely pathway through which deep gas migrated into the shallow aquifer. Measurements of soil gas near the gas well showed no evidence of methane emissions from the soil to the atmosphere even though methane concentrations in shallow groundwater (16 to 20mg/L) were above air-saturation levels. Methane degassing from the water table was likely oxidized in the relatively thick unsaturated zone (~18m), thus rendering the leak undetectable at land surface. Drilling and plugging records for oil and gas wells in Colorado and proxies for depth to groundwater indicated thousands of oil and gas wells were drilled and plugged in the same timeframe as the implicated gas well, and the majority of those wells were in areas with relatively large depths to groundwater. This study represents one of the few detailed subsurface investigations of methane leakage from a plugged and abandoned gas well. As such, it could provide a useful template for prioritizing and assessing potentially leaking wells, particularly in cases where the leakage does not manifest itself at land surface.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 28%
Researcher 9 23%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Lecturer 1 3%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 6 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 25%
Environmental Science 6 15%
Engineering 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Physics and Astronomy 1 3%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 13 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2018.
All research outputs
#9,434,275
of 15,557,767 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#8,679
of 14,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,594
of 280,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#259
of 458 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,557,767 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,290 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 458 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.