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Patients’ experiences and perceptions on associates of TB treatment adherence: a qualitative study on DOTS service in public health centers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
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1 tweeter

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Title
Patients’ experiences and perceptions on associates of TB treatment adherence: a qualitative study on DOTS service in public health centers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5404-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zekariyas Sahile, Abenezer Yared, Mirgissa Kaba

Abstract

Ethiopia is one of the countries with the highest TB burdens in the world. There are multitude of challenges related to the implementation of DOTS and adherence to treatment. This study aimed to assess patients' experiences and perceptions on associates of TB treatment adherence in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A phenomenological approach was employed to generate qualitative data through the in-depth interview of TB patients attending DOTS in two public health centers. A total of ten participants, who were purposively selected till conceptual saturation was reached, were interviewed using topic guides prepared in line with the study objectives. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and translated to English. Open Code software was used to facilitate analysis. Themes pertaining to patient, health service, therapeutic, and socioeconomic factors were developed, and findings were presented accordingly. Experience of missing medications was reported by a single participant. Most informants pointed out that TB is transmitted through coughing and expectorate, and prevented by letting in open air in public gatherings. However, most of them stated cold air and few mentioned contaminated food as causes of TB. Perceived risk of non-adherence to medication was among recounted reasons behind treatment adherence. Some informants also recalled to have had the intention of withdrawing medication due to perceived wellness, which they actually did not change into action. Most of the participants generally had smooth relationships with their DOTS service providers. Even if more than half of the patients preferred follow-ups by the same professional, most received DOTS service by two or more service providers. TB treatment non-adherence was not found to be a major challenge among the study participants. Perceived risk and wellness were implied to be responsible factors for adherence. Albeit the fact that few informants encountered unethical behaviors by some health professionals, interviewed patients generally had positive evaluation of the patient-provider relationship and the DOTS service obtained. There is a need to train and monitor DOTS service providers and ensure the provision of DOTS service by the same provider throughout the treatment period of a given patient.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 179 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 179 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 20%
Student > Bachelor 28 16%
Researcher 15 8%
Student > Postgraduate 12 7%
Lecturer 9 5%
Other 24 13%
Unknown 55 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 46 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 5%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 23 13%
Unknown 60 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,379,198
of 12,793,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#8,179
of 8,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#239,126
of 274,099 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
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