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Analysis of neuroanatomical differences in mice with genetically modified serotonin transporters assessed by structural magnetic resonance imaging

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, April 2018
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Title
Analysis of neuroanatomical differences in mice with genetically modified serotonin transporters assessed by structural magnetic resonance imaging
Published in
Molecular Autism, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13229-018-0210-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacob Ellegood, Yohan Yee, Travis M. Kerr, Christopher L. Muller, Randy D. Blakely, R. Mark Henkelman, Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jason P. Lerch

Abstract

The serotonin (5-HT) system has long been implicated in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as indicated by elevated whole blood and platelet 5-HT, altered platelet and brain receptor and transporter binding, and genetic linkage and association findings. Based upon work in genetically modified mice, 5-HT is known to influence several aspects of brain development, but systematic neuroimaging studies have not previously been reported. In particular, the 5-HT transporter (serotonin transporter, SERT; 5-HTT) gene, Slc6a4, has been extensively studied. Using a 7-T MRI and deformation-based morphometry, we assessed neuroanatomical differences in an Slc6a4 knockout mouse on a C57BL/6 genetic background, along with an Slc6a4 Ala56 knockin mouse on two different genetic backgrounds (129S and C57BL/6). Individually (same sex, same background, same genotype), the only differences found were in the female Slc6a4 knockout mouse; all the others had no significant differences. However, an analysis of variance across the whole study sample revealed a significant effect of Slc6a4 on the amygdala, thalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus, and lateral and frontal cortices. This work shows that an increase or decrease in SERT function has a significant effect on the neuroanatomy in 5-HT relevant regions, particularly the raphe nuclei. Notably, the Slc6a4 Ala56 knockin alone appears to have an insignificant, but suggestive, effect compared to the KO, which is consistent with Slc6a4 function. Despite the small number of 5-HT neurons and their localization to the brainstem, it is clear that 5-HT plays an important role in neuroanatomical organization.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 27%
Researcher 6 23%
Student > Master 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 31%
Neuroscience 7 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 12%
Psychology 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2018.
All research outputs
#10,893,244
of 13,697,025 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#399
of 425 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,217
of 272,181 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#1
of 1 outputs
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