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Papel de los roedores en la transmisión de Leptospira spp. en granjas porcinas

Overview of attention for article published in Revista de Salud Pública, July 2017
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Papel de los roedores en la transmisión de Leptospira spp. en granjas porcinas
Published in
Revista de Salud Pública, July 2017
DOI 10.15446/rsap.v19n4.41626
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catalina Ospina-Pinto, Manuel Rincon-Pardo, Diego Soler-Tovar, Patricia Hernández-Rodríguez

Abstract

Different species of rodents are potential transmitters of multiple zoonotic agents such as Leptospira spp., a spirochete that causes leptospirosis. This is an infectious disease that has a negative impact on pig production because it generates large productive, reproductive and economic losses. In swine farms, the most common rodent species are house mice (Mus musculus), brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) and black rats (Rattus rattus), which act as maintenance hosts for different serovars of Leptospira, contaminating the environment, food and water through urine, and putting human and animal health at risk. For this reason, the objective of this article is to describe the role of rodents in the transmission of Leptospira in swine farms. For this purpose, a bibliographic search was carried out in different databases such as Science Direct, Scopus, Redalyc, PubMed and SciELO. The results of the literature review show that there are few studies that report the importance of rodents in the transmission of Leptospira in swine farms. The onset of the disease depends to a large extent on the presence, contact and control of rodents in farms, although environmental factors, agent survival and hygiene, among others, must also be considered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Unspecified 2 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 3%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 10 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Unspecified 2 6%
Arts and Humanities 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 9 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,511,798
of 13,807,706 outputs
Outputs from Revista de Salud Pública
#61
of 114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,079
of 275,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista de Salud Pública
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,807,706 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 114 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.5. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,593 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them