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Correlates of high-impact physical activity measured objectively in older British adults

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Public Health, December 2017
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Title
Correlates of high-impact physical activity measured objectively in older British adults
Published in
Journal of Public Health, December 2017
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdx171
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ahmed Elhakeem, Kimberly Hannam, Kevin C Deere, April Hartley, Emma M Clark, Charlotte Moss, Mark H Edwards, Elaine Dennison, Tim Gaysin, Diana Kuh, Andrew Wong, Kenneth R Fox, Cyrus Cooper, Rachel Cooper, Jon H Tobias

Abstract

Exposure to higher magnitude vertical impacts is thought to benefit bone health. The correlates of this high-impact physical activity (PA) in later life are unknown. Participants were from the Cohort for Skeletal Health in Bristol and Avon, Hertfordshire Cohort Study and MRC National Survey of Health and Development. Associations of demographic, behavioural, physiological and psychological factors with vertical acceleration peaks ≥1.5 g (i.e. high-impact PA) from 7-day hip-worn accelerometer recordings were examined using linear regression. A total of 1187 participants (mean age = 72.7 years, 66.6% females) were included. Age, sex, education, active transport, self-reported higher impact PA, walking speed and self-rated health were independently associated with high-impact PA whereas BMI and sleep quality showed borderline independent associations. For example, differences in log-high-impact counts were 0.50 (P < 0.001) for men versus women and -0.56 (P < 0.001) for worst versus best self-rated health. Our final model explained 23% of between-participant variance in high impacts. Other correlates were not associated with high-impact activity after adjustment. Besides age and sex, several factors were associated with higher impact PA in later life. Our findings help identify characteristics of older people that might benefit from interventions designed to promote osteogenic PA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 27%
Researcher 3 27%
Student > Master 2 18%
Unspecified 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 45%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Sports and Recreations 2 18%
Physics and Astronomy 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2019.
All research outputs
#10,088,306
of 13,205,256 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Public Health
#1,436
of 1,704 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,866
of 270,819 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Public Health
#43
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,205,256 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,704 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.