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The Challenge of Drugging Undruggable Targets in Cancer: Lessons Learned from Targeting BCL-2 Family Members

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Cancer Research, December 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
patent
48 patents
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
290 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
364 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
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Title
The Challenge of Drugging Undruggable Targets in Cancer: Lessons Learned from Targeting BCL-2 Family Members
Published in
Clinical Cancer Research, December 2007
DOI 10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-07-2184
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gregory L. Verdine, Loren D. Walensky

Abstract

The genomic and proteomic revolutions have provided us with an ever-increasing number of mechanistic insights into cancer pathogenesis. Mutated genes and pathologic protein products have emerged as the basis for modern anticancer drug development. With the increasing realization of the importance of disrupting oncogenic protein-protein interaction, new challenges have emerged for classical small molecule and protein-based drug modalities, i.e., the critical need to target flat and extended protein surfaces. Here, we highlight two distinct technologies that are being used to bridge the pharmacologic gap between small molecules and protein therapeutics. With the BCL-2 family of survival proteins as their substrate for intracellular targeting, we conclude that peptide stapling and fragment-based drug discovery show promise to traverse the critical surface features of proteins that drive human cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 364 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 2%
France 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 346 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 102 28%
Researcher 77 21%
Student > Master 30 8%
Student > Bachelor 30 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 5%
Other 54 15%
Unknown 51 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 110 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 96 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 51 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 12 3%
Other 23 6%
Unknown 54 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2022.
All research outputs
#1,361,282
of 21,728,137 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Cancer Research
#991
of 12,331 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,397
of 371,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Cancer Research
#23
of 216 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,728,137 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,331 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 216 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.