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The Importance of Body Composition in Explaining the Overweight Paradox in Cancer—Counterpoint

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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89 Dimensions

Readers on

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89 Mendeley
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Title
The Importance of Body Composition in Explaining the Overweight Paradox in Cancer—Counterpoint
Published in
Cancer Research, April 2018
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-17-3287
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bette J. Caan, Elizabeth M. Cespedes Feliciano, Candyce H. Kroenke

Abstract

Despite a greater risk of cancer associated with higher BMI, overweight (BMI 25-<30 kg/m2) and class I obese (BMI 30-<35 kg/m2) patients often have a paradoxically lower risk of overall mortality after a cancer diagnosis, a phenomenon called the "obesity paradox." Only when patients exceed a BMI ≥35 kg/m2 are elevations in mortality risk consistently noted. This paradox has been dismissed as the result of methodologic bias, which we will describe and debate here. However, even if such bias influences associations, there is growing evidence that body composition may in part explain the paradox. This phenomenon may more accurately be described as a BMI paradox. That is, BMI is a poor proxy for adiposity and does not distinguish muscle from adipose tissue, nor describe adipose tissue distribution. Low muscle mass is associated with higher risk of recurrence, overall and cancer-specific mortality, surgical complications, and treatment-related toxicities. Patients with who are overweight or obese have on average higher levels of muscle than their normal-weight counterparts. Also, there is some evidence that patients with moderate levels of subcutaneous adipose tissue may have lower mortality. More research utilizing body composition is needed to clarify the effects of adiposity on cancer mortality. Cancer Res; 78(8); 1906-12. ©2018 AACR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 89 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 10%
Other 8 9%
Student > Master 7 8%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 30 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 8%
Unspecified 5 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 38 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2022.
All research outputs
#12,339,815
of 21,744,520 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#12,553
of 17,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,085
of 299,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#71
of 150 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,744,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,489 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,961 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 150 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.