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Gun carrying among freshmen and sophomores in Chicago, New York City and Los Angeles public schools: the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2007-2013

Overview of attention for article published in Injury Epidemiology, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 154)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
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Title
Gun carrying among freshmen and sophomores in Chicago, New York City and Los Angeles public schools: the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 2007-2013
Published in
Injury Epidemiology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40621-018-0143-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Samaa Kemal, Karen Sheehan, Joe Feinglass

Abstract

This study evaluated trends and risk factors over time for self-reported gun carrying among freshman and sophomore public school students in Chicago, New York City and Los Angeles, chosen as high profile cities with different levels of firearm violence. The study used four biennial waves (2007-2013) of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), an anonymous, voluntary survey of public high school students. Analyses were restricted to freshman and sophomores given significant high school dropout rates among older students. School population weighted results are presented based on the YRBS complex survey design, including comparisons of reported gun carrying across survey waves and cities. A violence index was created from eight survey items that capture students' perceived threat level. Chi square tests and multivariable Poisson regression analyses were used to test the significance of differences across cities and over time in the likelihood of gun carrying controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, mental health risk factors and behavioral risk factors. The study included a total weighted population estimate of 1,137,449 students across the three cities and four survey waves. Mean self-reported gun carrying across all survey waves was 8.89% in Chicago, 4.09% in New York City, and 6.03% in Los Angeles (p < 0.001). There were no significant changes in gun carrying prevalence within each individual city over the survey waves. Multivariable Poisson regression estimates showed increased likelihood for gun carrying among males (IRR 1.41, CI 1.27-1.58), among non-Hispanic Blacks (IRR 1.26, CI 1.07-1.48), and among those who reported a higher violence index. Each additional violence index count increase was associated with a 1.74 times (CI 1.70-1.78) increased likelihood for gun carrying. There was a much higher self-reported rate of gun carrying and a higher burden of violence exposure in Chicago as compared to New York City and Los Angeles. Students' exposure to violence extended to other stressors illuminated by the YRBS including fighting, perceptions of safety, and other high-risk behaviors. Through the violence index we created, we are better able to categorize the most high-risk individuals and describe the magnitude of their increased likelihood to carry a gun.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 25%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Professor 1 3%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 9 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 9 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Computer Science 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 10 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2018.
All research outputs
#781,761
of 13,780,426 outputs
Outputs from Injury Epidemiology
#34
of 154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,886
of 272,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Injury Epidemiology
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,780,426 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 154 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them