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Aquatic adaptation and the evolution of smell and taste in whales

Overview of attention for article published in Zoological Letters, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 136)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
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Title
Aquatic adaptation and the evolution of smell and taste in whales
Published in
Zoological Letters, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40851-014-0002-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takushi Kishida, JGM Thewissen, Takashi Hayakawa, Hiroo Imai, Kiyokazu Agata

Abstract

While olfaction is one of the most important senses in most terrestrial mammals, it is absent in modern toothed whales (Odontoceti, Cetacea). Furthermore, behavioral evidence suggests that gustation is very limited. In contrast, their aquatic sistergroup, baleen whales (Mysticeti) retain small but functional olfactory organs, and nothing is known about their gustation. It is difficult to investigate mysticete chemosensory abilities because experiments in a controlled setting are impossible. Here, we use the functional regionalization of the olfactory bulb (OB) to identify the loss of specific olfactory functions in mysticetes. We provide the whole-genome sequence of a mysticete and show that mysticetes lack the dorsal domain of the OB, an area known to induce innate avoidance behavior against odors of predators and spoiled foods. Genomic and fossil data suggest that mysticetes lost the dorsal domain of the OB before the Odontoceti-Mysticeti split. Furthermore, we found that all modern cetaceans are revealed to have lost the functional taste receptors. These results strongly indicate that profound changes in the chemosensory capabilities had occurred in the cetacean lineage during the period when ancestral whales migrated from land to water.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 2 2%
Unknown 102 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 18 17%
Researcher 18 17%
Student > Master 15 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 13%
Student > Postgraduate 9 9%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 12 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 60 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 12%
Environmental Science 8 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 15 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2020.
All research outputs
#800,636
of 16,097,522 outputs
Outputs from Zoological Letters
#14
of 136 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,762
of 218,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Zoological Letters
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,097,522 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 136 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 218,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them