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Managing a Subsidized Predator Population: Reducing Common Raven Predation on Desert Tortoises

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Management, September 2003
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Title
Managing a Subsidized Predator Population: Reducing Common Raven Predation on Desert Tortoises
Published in
Environmental Management, September 2003
DOI 10.1007/s00267-003-2982-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

William I. Boarman

Abstract

Human communities often are an inadvertent source of food, water, and other resources to native species of wildlife. Because these resources are more stable and predictable than those in a natural environment, animals that subsist on them are able to increase in numbers and expand their range, much to the detriment of their competitors and species they prey upon. In the Mojave Desert, common ravens (Corvus corax) have benefited from human-provided resources to increase in population size precipitously in recent years. This trend has caused concern because ravens prey on juvenile desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizi), a federally threatened species. In this paper, I discuss management strategies to reduce raven predation on desert tortoises. The recommendations fall into three categories: (1) managing raven populations by reducing access to anthropogenic resources; (2) removing offending ravens or other birds in specially targeted tortoise management zones; and (3) continuing research on raven ecology, raven behavior, and methods of reducing raven predation on tortoises. I also recommend approaching the problem within an adaptive management framework: management efforts should first be employed as scientific experiments--with replicates and controls--to yield an unbiased assessment of their effectiveness. Furthermore, these strategies should be implemented in concert with actions that reduce other causes of desert tortoise mortality to aid the long-term recovery of their populations. Overall, the approaches outlined in this paper are widely applicable to the management of subsidized predators, particularly where they present a threat to a declining species of prey.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
Unknown 85 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 28%
Student > Master 16 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Other 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 4%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 16 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 57%
Environmental Science 14 16%
Psychology 2 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 17 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2020.
All research outputs
#18,230,732
of 22,568,248 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Management
#1,476
of 1,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,159
of 51,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Management
#6
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,568,248 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,726 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 51,493 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.