↓ Skip to main content

Parental risk perceptions of child exposure to tobacco smoke

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Parental risk perceptions of child exposure to tobacco smoke
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1434-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Rosen, Inessa Kostjukovsky

Abstract

Tobacco smoke exposure harms children and adults. Yet, 40% of children worldwide are exposed to tobacco smoke in their homes. Such widespread parental failure to protect children is puzzling, and may be related to risk perceptions. No consensus exists about how to measure parental risk perceptions of tobacco smoke exposure. The objective of this research was to study Parental Risk Perceptions of child Exposure to Tobacco Smoke (PRETS) using various dimensions of risk perceptions: likelihood of harm, susceptibility to harm, and severity of harm. We aimed to estimate PRETS and identify correlates of PRETS, and assess the association between PRETS, parental smoking status, and home smoking behaviors. We conducted 132 face-to-face interviews with parents of infants. Parents who smoked regularly believed that infant tobacco smoke exposure was less dangerous than did other parents (p = .0158). Birthplace of parent was significantly associated with risk perception (p = .0019); parents of Russian origin believed the overall risk to be less than did those born elsewhere. Smoking status, ethnicity, and employment status were associated with smoking in the home. The relationship between smoking behavior in the home and risk perceptions was complex, and may have been modified by ethnicity. Parental risk perceptions concerning child exposure to tobacco smoke are associated with smoking behavior and ethnicity. Understanding how to measure risk perceptions, and identifying risk perception dimensions which differ between families with and without home smoking bans, may contribute to the development of effective interventions to protect children from the harmful effects of tobacco smoke exposure.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 58 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 25%
Researcher 15 25%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 15 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 20%
Psychology 7 12%
Social Sciences 6 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2015.
All research outputs
#7,496,069
of 9,723,500 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,518
of 7,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,929
of 217,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#150
of 173 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,723,500 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.9. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,476 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 173 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.