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Lack of evolutionary adjustment to ambient temperature in highly specialized cave beetles

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

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1 news outlet
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1 tweeter

Citations

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18 Dimensions

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Lack of evolutionary adjustment to ambient temperature in highly specialized cave beetles
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0288-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valeria Rizzo, David Sánchez-Fernández, Javier Fresneda, Alexandra Cieslak, Ignacio Ribera

Abstract

BackgroundA key question in evolutionary biology is the relationship between species traits and their habitats. Caves offer an ideal model to test the adjustment of species to their surrounding temperature, as they provide homogeneous and simple environments. We compared two species living under different thermal conditions within a lineage of Pyrenean beetles highly modified for the subterranean life since the Miocene. One, Troglocharinus fonti, is found in caves at 4-11°C in the ancestral Pyrenean range. The second, T. ferreri, inhabits the coastal area of Catalonia since the early Pliocene, and lives at 14-16°C.ResultsWe found no differences in their short term upper thermal limit (ca. 50°C), similar to that of most organisms, or their lower thermal limit (ca. -2.5°C), higher than for most temperate insects and suggesting the absence of cryoprotectants. In longer term tests (7 days) survival between 6-20°C was almost 100% for both species plus two outgroups of the same lineage, but all four died between 23-25°C, without significant differences between them.ConclusionsOur results suggest that species in this lineage have lost some of the thermoregulatory mechanisms common in temperate insects, as their inferred default tolerance range is larger than the thermal variation experienced through their whole evolutionary history.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 6%
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 31 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 29%
Researcher 8 24%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 59%
Environmental Science 7 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 9%
Computer Science 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2015.
All research outputs
#444,621
of 4,786,878 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#243
of 1,505 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,705
of 151,543 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#17
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,786,878 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,505 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 151,543 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.