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The impact of preterm birth on participation in childhood occupation

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pediatrics, August 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of preterm birth on participation in childhood occupation
Published in
European Journal of Pediatrics, August 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00431-014-2393-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hazel Killeen, Agnes Shiel, Mary Law, Ricardo Segurado, Donough O’Donovan

Abstract

Outcome studies of premature babies have focused their assessments predominately on neurodevelopmental impairments without relating these deficits to the impact they have on a child's everyday life. This study aims to determine whether very 'preterm birth alone' impacts on a child's ability to participate in and carry out childhood activities. Forty-four former premature infants between 6 months and 5 years 6 months, born in Galway University Hospital, Ireland, without physical or intellectual disability, were compared with 51 age-matched term-born infants. Study infants had an average gestation of 29 weeks and birth weight of 1,145 g. Functional skills were assessed using the Adaptive Behavior Assessment Scale-II and the Assessment of Preschool Children's Participation. Premature infants had significantly lower mean scores in overall adaptive behaviour compared to term infants, regardless of whether chronological (difference = 13.6, 95 % (CI) = [8.2, 19.1]) or corrected (difference = 6.6, 95 % CI = [1.4, 11.8]) age was used. Premature infants had lower mean scores in conceptual, social and practical skills, but no difference was found between the groups in intensity or diversity of participation. Conclusion: Premature infants had significantly lower scores in adaptive behaviour than term infants. This measurable effect of preterm birth on 'childhood occupations' merits further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 28%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 3 6%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 22%
Psychology 5 9%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2015.
All research outputs
#7,024,334
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pediatrics
#1,338
of 2,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,081
of 229,342 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pediatrics
#22
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,136 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,342 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.