↓ Skip to main content

The second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D): a risk factor of migraine and Tension-type headache

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Headache & Pain, February 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

weibo
1 weibo user

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D): a risk factor of migraine and Tension-type headache
Published in
Journal of Headache & Pain, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s10194-015-0494-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei Xie, Mianwang He, Ruozhuo Liu, Zhao Dong, Jingdan Xie, Dan Wang, Shengyuan Yu

Abstract

Migraine and Tension-type headache (TTH) are common and disabling primary headache disorders. They are more prevalent in females. The second to fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) is sexually dimorphic in humans and is considered to be a marker for the balance of prenatal testosterone and estrogen exposure. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that prenatal sex steroids constitute an independent risk factor for adult headaches later in life. A total of 891 individuals (303 males, 588 females) of 18-68 years in age (a mean of 37.0 ± 10.1 years), including 279 migraine, 300 TTH, and 312 healthy subjects were enrolled. The 2D:4D ratio was measured by a single investigator using a digital Vernier caliper. The females in the migraine group had lower 2D:4D ratios than those in the control group (left hand: 0.947 ± 0.034 vs. 0.955 ± 0.038, p = 0.048; right hand: 0.952 ± 0.035 vs. 0.965 ± 0.037, p = 0.001). There was a similar relationship between the TTH group and the control group (left hand: 0.946 ± 0.034 vs. 0.955 ± 0.038, p = 0.034; right hand: 0.954 ± 0.035 vs. 0.965 ± 0.037, p = 0.005), although this was not observed in males. Males showed lower 2D:4D ratios than females for the right hand in the control group (0.954 ± 0.039 vs. 0.965 ± 0.037, p = 0.015). No significant difference was found in the left hand. These results suggested that the 2D:4D ratio is a risk factor of migraine and TTH and that the balance of prenatal estrogen and testosterone in utero may impact adult primary headache disorders.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 5 23%
Researcher 3 14%
Professor 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Psychology 4 18%
Neuroscience 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Unknown 6 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2015.
All research outputs
#7,641,611
of 12,229,156 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Headache & Pain
#486
of 728 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,318
of 224,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Headache & Pain
#9
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,229,156 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 728 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,628 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.