↓ Skip to main content

Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, September 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
66 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication
Published in
PLoS ONE, September 2015
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0138098
Pubmed ID
Authors

Talayeh Aledavood, Eduardo López, Sam G. B. Roberts, Felix Reed-Tsochas, Esteban Moro, Robin I. M. Dunbar, Jari Saramäki

Abstract

Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals' social networks. Further, women's calls were longer than men's calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls were typically focused on a small number of emotionally intense relationships. These results demonstrate that individual differences in circadian rhythms are not just related to broad patterns of morningness and eveningness, but have a strong social component, in directing phone calls to specific individuals at specific times of day.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 66 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 8%
Spain 2 3%
Luxembourg 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
France 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Austria 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 45 76%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 20%
Researcher 12 20%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Other 16 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Computer Science 17 29%
Social Sciences 10 17%
Psychology 7 12%
Physics and Astronomy 5 8%
Unspecified 4 7%
Other 16 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 68. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2018.
All research outputs
#215,148
of 12,417,146 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#4,409
of 136,446 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,667
of 219,396 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#130
of 3,260 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,417,146 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 136,446 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 219,396 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,260 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.