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Metagenomic characterization of viral communities in corals: mining biological signal from methodological noise

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Microbiology, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
132 Mendeley
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Title
Metagenomic characterization of viral communities in corals: mining biological signal from methodological noise
Published in
Environmental Microbiology, March 2015
DOI 10.1111/1462-2920.12803
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisha M. Wood-Charlson, Karen D. Weynberg, Curtis A. Suttle, Simon Roux, Madeleine J. H. van Oppen

Abstract

Reef-building corals form close associations with organisms from all three domains of life and therefore have many potential viral hosts. Yet, knowledge of viral communities associated with corals is barely explored. This complexity presents a number of challenges in terms of the metagenomic assessments of coral viral communities, and requires specialised methods for purification and amplification of viral nucleic acids, as well as virome annotation. In this mini-review, we conduct a meta-analysis of the limited number of existing coral virome studies, as well as available coral transcriptome and metagenome data, to identify trends and potential complications inherent in different methods. The analysis shows that the method used for viral nucleic acid isolation drastically affects the observed viral assemblage and interpretation of the results. Further, the small number of viral reference genomes available, coupled with short sequence read lengths might cause errors in virus identification. Despite these limitations and potential biases, the data show that viral communities associated with corals are diverse, with double- and single-stranded DNA and RNA viruses. The identified viruses are dominated by dsDNA-tailed bacteriophages, but there are also viruses that infect eukaryote hosts, likely the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates, Symbiodinium spp., host coral, and other eukaryotes in close association.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 132 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Fiji 1 <1%
Unknown 126 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 29%
Researcher 30 23%
Student > Master 20 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Other 25 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 63 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 18%
Environmental Science 19 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 7%
Unspecified 9 7%
Other 8 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2016.
All research outputs
#1,838,113
of 12,184,206 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Microbiology
#686
of 2,595 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,351
of 224,456 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Microbiology
#10
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,184,206 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,595 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,456 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.