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Interaction specificity between leaf-cutting ants and vertically transmitted Pseudonocardia bacteria

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Interaction specificity between leaf-cutting ants and vertically transmitted Pseudonocardia bacteria
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0308-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandra B Andersen, Sze Yek, David R Nash, Jacobus J Boomsma

Abstract

The obligate mutualism between fungus-growing ants and microbial symbionts offers excellent opportunities to study the specificity and stability of multi-species interactions. In addition to cultivating fungus gardens, these ants have domesticated actinomycete bacteria to defend gardens against the fungal parasite Escovopsis and possibly other pathogens. Panamanian Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants primarily associate with actinomycetes of the genus Pseudonocardia. Colonies are inoculated with one of two vertically transmitted phylotypes (Ps1 or Ps2), and maintain the same phylotype over their lifetime. We performed a cross-fostering experiment to test whether co-adaptations between ants and bacterial phylotypes have evolved, and how this affects bacterial growth and ant prophylactic behavior after infection with Escovopsis. We show that Pseudonocardia readily colonized ants irrespective of their colony of origin, but that the Ps2 phylotype, which was previously shown to be better able to maintain its monocultural integrity after workers became foragers than Ps1, reached a higher final cover when grown on its native host than on alternative hosts. The frequencies of major grooming and weeding behaviors co-varied with symbiont/host combinations, showing that ant behavior also was affected when cuticular actinomycete phylotypes were swapped. These results show that the interactions between leaf-cutting ants and Pseudonocardia bear signatures of mutual co-adaptation within a single ant population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Denmark 2 2%
Unknown 77 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 20%
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Master 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Other 20 24%
Unknown 10 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Chemistry 3 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 15 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2015.
All research outputs
#1,971,511
of 9,723,582 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#790
of 2,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,863
of 209,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#22
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,723,582 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,165 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,994 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.