↓ Skip to main content

Fish Assemblage Response to a Small Dam Removal in the Eightmile River System, Connecticut, USA

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Management, July 2014
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Fish Assemblage Response to a Small Dam Removal in the Eightmile River System, Connecticut, USA
Published in
Environmental Management, July 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00267-014-0314-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helen M. Poulos, Kate E. Miller, Michelle L. Kraczkowski, Adam W. Welchel, Ross Heineman, Barry Chernoff

Abstract

We examined the effects of the Zemko Dam removal on the Eightmile River system in Salem, Connecticut, USA. The objective of this research was to quantify spatiotemporal variation in fish community composition in response to small dam removal. We sampled fish abundance over a 6-year period (2005-2010) to quantify changes in fish assemblages prior to dam removal, during drawdown, and for three years following dam removal. Fish population dynamics were examined above the dam, below the dam, and at two reference sites by indicator species analysis, mixed models, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and analysis of similarity. We observed significant shifts in fish relative abundance over time in response to dam removal. Changes in fish species composition were variable, and they occurred within 1 year of drawdown. A complete shift from lentic to lotic fishes failed to occur within 3 years after the dam was removed. However, we did observe increases in fluvial and transition (i.e., pool head, pool tail, or run) specialist fishes both upstream and downstream from the former dam site. Our results demonstrate the importance of dam removal for restoring river connectivity for fish movement. While the long-term effects of dam removal remain uncertain, we conclude that dam removals can have positive benefits on fish assemblages by enhancing river connectivity and fluvial habitat availability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 6%
France 1 2%
Indonesia 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Malaysia 1 2%
Unknown 55 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 20%
Student > Master 12 19%
Student > Bachelor 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 26 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 38%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Computer Science 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2015.
All research outputs
#9,773,417
of 12,230,855 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Management
#922
of 1,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#156,042
of 223,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Management
#26
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,855 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,118 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,951 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.