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Reduced Bone Density and Vertebral Fractures in Smokers. Men and COPD Patients at Increased Risk

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of the American Thoracic Society, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 1,818)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
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Title
Reduced Bone Density and Vertebral Fractures in Smokers. Men and COPD Patients at Increased Risk
Published in
Annals of the American Thoracic Society, May 2015
DOI 10.1513/annalsats.201412-591oc
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joshua D. Jaramillo, Carla Wilson, Douglas J. Stinson, David A. Lynch, Russell P. Bowler, Sharon Lutz, Jessica M. Bon, Ben Arnold, Merry-Lynn N. McDonald, George R. Washko, Emily S. Wan, Dawn L. DeMeo, Marilyn G. Foreman, Xavier Soler, Sarah E. Lindsay, Nancy E. Lane, Harry K. Genant, Edwin K. Silverman, John E. Hokanson, Barry J. Make, James D. Crapo, Elizabeth A. Regan

Abstract

Rationale: Former smoking history and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are potential risk factors for osteoporosis and fractures. Under existing guidelines for osteoporosis screening, women are included but men are not, and only current smoking is considered. Objectives: To demonstrate the impact of COPD and smoking history on the risk of osteoporosis and vertebral fracture in men and women. Measurements: Volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) by calibrated quantitative CT (QCT), visually scored vertebral fractures and severity of lung disease were determined from chest CT scans of 3321 current and ex-smokers in COPDGene study. Low volumetric bone mineral density as a surrogate for osteoporosis was calculated from young adult normal values. Methods: Characteristics of participants with low volumetric bone mineral density were identified and associated to COPD and other risk factors. We tested associations of gender and COPD to both volumetric bone mineral density and fractures adjusting for age, race, BMI, smoking and glucocorticoid use. Main Results: Male smokers had a small but significantly greater risk of low volumetric bone mineral density (- 2.5 SD below young adult mean by calibrated quantitative CT) and more fractures than female smokers. Low volumetric bone mineral density was present in 58% of all subjects, was more frequent with worse COPD and rose to 84% of very severe COPD subjects. Vertebral fractures were present in 37% of all subjects and were associated with lower volumetric bone mineral density at each GOLD stage. Vertebral fractures were most common in the mid-thoracic region. COPD and specifically emphysema were associated with both low volumetric bone mineral density and vertebral fractures after adjustment for steroid use, age, pack years, current smoking and exacerbations. Airway disease was associated with higher bone density after adjustment for other variables. Calibrated quantitative CT identified more abnormal subjects than the standard DXA in a subset of subjects and correlated well with prevalent fractures. Conclusion: Male smokers with and without COPD, have a significant risk of low bone mineral density and vertebral fractures. COPD was associated with low volumetric bone mineral density after adjusting for race, gender, BMI, smoking, steroid use, exacerbations and increasing age. Screening for low bone mineral density in men and women smokers using quantitative CT scanning will increase opportunities to identify and treat osteoporosis in this at-risk population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 57 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 17%
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Other 5 8%
Other 19 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 43%
Unspecified 15 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Psychology 4 7%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 8 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 82. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2019.
All research outputs
#207,659
of 13,646,851 outputs
Outputs from Annals of the American Thoracic Society
#46
of 1,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,490
of 214,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of the American Thoracic Society
#3
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,646,851 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,818 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 214,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.