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Chemoproteomics reveals Toll-like receptor fatty acylation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Chemoproteomics reveals Toll-like receptor fatty acylation
Published in
BMC Biology, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12915-014-0091-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicholas M Chesarino, Jocelyn C Hach, James L Chen, Balyn W Zaro, Murugesan VS Rajaram, Joanne Turner, Larry S Schlesinger, Matthew R Pratt, Howard C Hang, Jacob S Yount

Abstract

BackgroundPalmitoylation is a 16-carbon lipid post-translational modification that increases protein hydrophobicity. This form of protein fatty acylation is emerging as a critical regulatory modification for multiple aspects of cellular interactions and signaling. Despite recent advances in the development of chemical tools for the rapid identification and visualization of palmitoylated proteins, the palmitoyl proteome has not been fully defined. Here we sought to identify and compare the palmitoylated proteins in murine fibroblasts and dendritic cells.Results563 putative palmitoylation substrates were identified, more than 200 of which have not been previously suggested to be palmitoylated in past proteomic studies. Here we validate the palmitoylation of several new proteins including TLRs 2, 5, and 10, CD80, CD86, and NEDD4. Palmitoylation of TLR2, which was uniquely identified in dendritic cells, was mapped to a transmembrane domain-proximal cysteine. Inhibition of TLR2 S-palmitoylation pharmacologically or by cysteine mutagenesis led to decreased cell surface expression and a decreased inflammatory response to microbial ligands.ConclusionsThis work identifies many fatty acylated proteins involved in fundamental cellular processes as well as cell type-specific functions, highlighting the value of examining the palmitoyl proteomes of multiple cell types. S-palmitoylation of TLR2 is a previously unknown immunoregulatory mechanism that represents an entirely novel avenue for modulation of TLR2 inflammatory activity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 33%
Researcher 13 27%
Other 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Professor 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 29%
Chemistry 7 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2015.
All research outputs
#1,621,545
of 12,378,950 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#485
of 1,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,116
of 223,785 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#10
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,378,950 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,112 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,785 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.