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Survival and breeding of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea in relation to sea ice

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, January 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
171 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
394 Mendeley
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Title
Survival and breeding of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea in relation to sea ice
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, January 2010
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2009.01603.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric V. Regehr, Christine M. Hunter, Hal Caswell, Steven C. Amstrup, Ian Stirling

Abstract

1. Observed and predicted declines in Arctic sea ice have raised concerns about marine mammals. In May 2008, the US Fish and Wildlife Service listed polar bears (Ursus maritimus) - one of the most ice-dependent marine mammals - as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. 2. We evaluated the effects of sea ice conditions on vital rates (survival and breeding probabilities) for polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea. Although sea ice declines in this and other regions of the polar basin have been among the greatest in the Arctic, to date population-level effects of sea ice loss on polar bears have only been identified in western Hudson Bay, near the southern limit of the species' range. 3. We estimated vital rates using multistate capture-recapture models that classified individuals by sex, age and reproductive category. We used multimodel inference to evaluate a range of statistical models, all of which were structurally based on the polar bear life cycle. We estimated parameters by model averaging, and developed a parametric bootstrap procedure to quantify parameter uncertainty. 4. In the most supported models, polar bear survival declined with an increasing number of days per year that waters over the continental shelf were ice free. In 2001-2003, the ice-free period was relatively short (mean 101 days) and adult female survival was high (0.96-0.99, depending on reproductive state). In 2004 and 2005, the ice-free period was longer (mean 135 days) and adult female survival was low (0.73-0.79, depending on reproductive state). Breeding rates and cub litter survival also declined with increasing duration of the ice-free period. Confidence intervals on vital rate estimates were wide. 5. The effects of sea ice loss on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea may apply to polar bear populations in other portions of the polar basin that have similar sea ice dynamics and have experienced similar, or more severe, sea ice declines. Our findings therefore are relevant to the extinction risk facing approximately one-third of the world's polar bears.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 394 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 1%
India 3 <1%
Canada 3 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
United Arab Emirates 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Other 7 2%
Unknown 369 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 72 18%
Researcher 70 18%
Student > Bachelor 66 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 65 16%
Other 32 8%
Other 46 12%
Unknown 43 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 197 50%
Environmental Science 97 25%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 16 4%
Social Sciences 9 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 2%
Other 16 4%
Unknown 52 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 90. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#275,894
of 17,355,315 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#72
of 2,551 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,391
of 222,104 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#1
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,355,315 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,551 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 222,104 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.