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Increased Abundance and Nursery Habitat Use of the Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas) in Response to a Changing Environment in a Warm-Temperate Estuary

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
284 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
Title
Increased Abundance and Nursery Habitat Use of the Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas) in Response to a Changing Environment in a Warm-Temperate Estuary
Published in
Scientific Reports, April 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-24510-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Charles W. Bangley, Lee Paramore, David S. Shiffman, Roger A. Rulifson

Abstract

A general northward shift in marine species distributions has been observed in the western North Atlantic Ocean, which may have significant ecological consequences. Large coastal sharks can have wide migratory distributions but show fidelity to specific nursery habitats. Here we show evidence for nursery range expansion into Pamlico Sound, North Carolina by a marine apex predator, the Bull Shark (Carcharhinus leucas). Previous assessments have shown little to no use of estuarine North Carolina waters as nursery habitat by Bull Sharks from 1965-2011. Juvenile sharks were rarely captured in a fishery-independent gillnet survey conducted by the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries (NCDMF) from 2003-2011, but were present every year from 2011-2016. Juvenile Bull Shark presence in the Sound was strongly related to early summer temperatures and late summer salinities, which have increased in the estuary over the 13 survey years, and further evidence for increasing water temperatures in Pamlico Sound was found in a 45-year data set for the NCDMF estuarine trawl survey. These results suggest that increasing water temperature and salinity have allowed Bull Sharks to expand their nursery habitat. This shift will have unknown, but potentially strong, impacts on both the local ecosystem and interactions with humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 284 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 115 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 15%
Researcher 16 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 17 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 57 50%
Environmental Science 16 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 29 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 350. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2021.
All research outputs
#50,479
of 17,654,026 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#666
of 95,139 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,521
of 234,003 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,654,026 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 95,139 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,003 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them