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The impact of eliminating age inequalities in stage at diagnosis on breast cancer survival for older women

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Cancer, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
Title
The impact of eliminating age inequalities in stage at diagnosis on breast cancer survival for older women
Published in
British Journal of Cancer, March 2015
DOI 10.1038/bjc.2015.51
Pubmed ID
Authors

M J Rutherford, G A Abel, D C Greenberg, P C Lambert, G Lyratzopoulos

Abstract

Background:Older women with breast cancer have poorer relative survival outcomes, but whether achieving earlier stage at diagnosis would translate to substantial reductions in mortality is uncertain.Methods:We analysed data on East of England women with breast cancer (2006-2010) aged 70+ years. We estimated survival for different stage-deprivation-age group strata using both the observed and a hypothetical stage distribution (assuming that all women aged 75+ years acquired the stage distribution of those aged 70-74 years). We subsequently estimated deaths that could be postponed beyond 5 years from diagnosis if women aged 75+ years had the hypothetical stage distribution. We projected findings to the English population using appropriate age and socioeconomic group weights.Results:For a typically sized annual cohort in the East of England, 27 deaths in women with breast cancer aged 75+ years can be postponed within 5 years from diagnosis if their stage distribution matched that of the women aged 70-74 years (4.8% of all 566 deaths within 5 years post diagnosis in this population). Under assumptions, we estimate that the respective number for England would be 280 deaths (5.0% of all deaths within 5 years post diagnosis in this population).Conclusions:The findings support ongoing development of targeted campaigns aimed at encouraging prompt presentation in older women.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 3 March 2015; doi:10.1038/bjc.2015.51 www.bjcancer.com.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 29%
Other 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Other 4 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 52%
Unspecified 3 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Social Sciences 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 March 2015.
All research outputs
#361,948
of 8,032,484 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Cancer
#233
of 4,150 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,033
of 201,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Cancer
#21
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,032,484 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,150 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,968 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.