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Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 14,124)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
78 news outlets
blogs
24 blogs
twitter
671 tweeters
weibo
1 weibo user
facebook
71 Facebook pages
googleplus
70 Google+ users
reddit
3 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Readers on

mendeley
518 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Photonic crystals cause active colour change in chameleons
Published in
Nature Communications, March 2015
DOI 10.1038/ncomms7368
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jérémie Teyssier, Suzanne V. Saenko, Dirk van der Marel, Michel C. Milinkovitch, Teyssier J, Saenko SV, van der Marel D, Milinkovitch MC

Abstract

Many chameleons, and panther chameleons in particular, have the remarkable ability to exhibit complex and rapid colour changes during social interactions such as male contests or courtship. It is generally interpreted that these changes are due to dispersion/aggregation of pigment-containing organelles within dermal chromatophores. Here, combining microscopy, photometric videography and photonic band-gap modelling, we show that chameleons shift colour through active tuning of a lattice of guanine nanocrystals within a superficial thick layer of dermal iridophores. In addition, we show that a deeper population of iridophores with larger crystals reflects a substantial proportion of sunlight especially in the near-infrared range. The organization of iridophores into two superposed layers constitutes an evolutionary novelty for chameleons, which allows some species to combine efficient camouflage with spectacular display, while potentially providing passive thermal protection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 671 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 518 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 21 4%
Brazil 6 1%
United Kingdom 5 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
South Africa 2 <1%
Austria 2 <1%
Switzerland 2 <1%
Other 13 3%
Unknown 460 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 151 29%
Student > Bachelor 83 16%
Researcher 81 16%
Student > Master 76 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 31 6%
Other 96 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 145 28%
Physics and Astronomy 100 19%
Chemistry 69 13%
Engineering 61 12%
Materials Science 57 11%
Other 86 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1363. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2017.
All research outputs
#954
of 8,662,494 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#8
of 14,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35
of 204,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 644 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,662,494 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,124 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 44.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 204,111 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 644 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.