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Long-Term and Seasonal Trend Decomposition of Maumee River Nutrient Inputs to Western Lake Erie

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, February 2015
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Title
Long-Term and Seasonal Trend Decomposition of Maumee River Nutrient Inputs to Western Lake Erie
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, February 2015
DOI 10.1021/es5062648
Pubmed ID
Authors

Craig A. Stow, YoonKyung Cha, Laura T. Johnson, Remegio Confesor, R. Peter Richards

Abstract

Cyanobacterial blooms in western Lake Erie have recently garnered widespread attention. Current evidence indicates that a major source of the nutrients that fuel these blooms is the Maumee River. We applied a seasonal trend decomposition technique to examine long-term and seasonal changes in Maumee River discharge and nutrient concentrations and loads. Our results indicate similar long-term increases in both regional precipitation and Maumee River discharge (1975-2013), although changes in the seasonal cycles are less pronounced. Total and dissolved phosphorus concentrations declined from the 1970s into the 1990s; since then, total phosphorus concentrations have been relatively stable, while dissolved phosphorus concentrations have increased. However, both total and dissolved phosphorus loads have increased since the 1990s because of the Maumee River discharge increases. Total nitrogen and nitrate concentrations and loads exhibited patterns that were almost the reverse of those of phosphorus, with increases into the 1990s and decreases since then. Seasonal changes in concentrations and loads were also apparent with increases since approximately 1990 in March phosphorus concentrations and loads. These documented changes in phosphorus, nitrogen, and suspended solids likely reflect changing land-use practices. Knowledge of these patterns should facilitate efforts to better manage ongoing eutrophication problems in western Lake Erie.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 147 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 143 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 22%
Researcher 30 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 20 14%
Unknown 23 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 49 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 18%
Engineering 14 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 9%
Chemistry 4 3%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 38 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2015.
All research outputs
#9,833,806
of 12,313,065 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#11,038
of 12,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,289
of 225,258 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#238
of 292 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,313,065 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 225,258 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 292 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.