Scanning ultrasound removes amyloid-β and restores memory in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

Overview of attention for article published in Science Translational Medicine, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 2,620)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Readers on

mendeley
367 Mendeley
citeulike
7 CiteULike
Title
Scanning ultrasound removes amyloid-β and restores memory in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.
Published in
Science Translational Medicine, March 2015
DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.aaa2512
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerhard Leinenga, Jürgen Götz

Abstract

Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We present a nonpharmacological approach for removing Aβ and restoring memory function in a mouse model of AD in which Aβ is deposited in the brain. We used repeated scanning ultrasound (SUS) treatments of the mouse brain to remove Aβ, without the need for any additional therapeutic agent such as anti-Aβ antibody. Spinning disk confocal microscopy and high-resolution three-dimensional reconstruction revealed extensive internalization of Aβ into the lysosomes of activated microglia in mouse brains subjected to SUS, with no concomitant increase observed in the number of microglia. Plaque burden was reduced in SUS-treated AD mice compared to sham-treated animals, and cleared plaques were observed in 75% of SUS-treated mice. Treated AD mice also displayed improved performance on three memory tasks: the Y-maze, the novel object recognition test, and the active place avoidance task. Our findings suggest that repeated SUS is useful for removing Aβ in the mouse brain without causing overt damage, and should be explored further as a noninvasive method with therapeutic potential in AD.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 367 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 19 5%
United Kingdom 9 2%
France 3 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
Chile 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Finland 2 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Other 8 2%
Unknown 316 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 115 31%
Researcher 69 19%
Student > Bachelor 57 16%
Student > Master 43 12%
Student > Postgraduate 18 5%
Other 65 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 127 35%
Medicine and Dentistry 57 16%
Neuroscience 40 11%
Engineering 35 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 8%
Other 80 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1384. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2017.
All research outputs
#626
of 7,430,852 outputs
Outputs from Science Translational Medicine
#3
of 2,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29
of 198,499 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Translational Medicine
#1
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,430,852 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,620 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,499 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.