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Evolution of Pathogen Virulence across Space during an Epidemic

Overview of attention for article published in The American Naturalist, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 3,372)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
24 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
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Title
Evolution of Pathogen Virulence across Space during an Epidemic
Published in
The American Naturalist, March 2015
DOI 10.1086/679734
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erik E. Osnas, Paul J. Hurtado, Andrew P. Dobson

Abstract

Abstract We explore pathogen virulence evolution during the spatial expansion of an infectious disease epidemic in the presence of a novel host movement trade-off, using a simple, spatially explicit mathematical model. This work is motivated by empirical observations of the Mycoplasma gallisepticum invasion into North American house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) populations; however, our results likely have important applications to other emerging infectious diseases in mobile hosts. We assume that infection reduces host movement and survival and that across pathogen strains the severity of these reductions increases with pathogen infectiousness. Assuming these trade-offs between pathogen virulence (host mortality), pathogen transmission, and host movement, we find that pathogen virulence levels near the epidemic front (that maximize wave speed) are lower than those that have a short-term growth rate advantage or that ultimately prevail (i.e., are evolutionarily stable) near the epicenter and where infection becomes endemic (i.e., that maximize the pathogen basic reproductive ratio). We predict that, under these trade-offs, less virulent pathogen strains will dominate the periphery of an epidemic and that more virulent strains will increase in frequency after invasion where disease is endemic. These results have important implications for observing and interpreting spatiotemporal epidemic data and may help explain transient virulence dynamics of emerging infectious diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 2%
Vietnam 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 83 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 33%
Researcher 19 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Professor 7 8%
Student > Master 7 8%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 7 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 56%
Environmental Science 8 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 3%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 12 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 208. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2020.
All research outputs
#102,763
of 17,773,620 outputs
Outputs from The American Naturalist
#11
of 3,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,552
of 224,546 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The American Naturalist
#1
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,773,620 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,372 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,546 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.