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Caregiver burden and caregiver appraisal of psychiatric symptoms are not modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in npj Parkinson's Disease, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
Title
Caregiver burden and caregiver appraisal of psychiatric symptoms are not modulated by subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease
Published in
npj Parkinson's Disease, April 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41531-018-0048-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip E. Mosley, Michael Breakspear, Terry Coyne, Peter Silburn, David Smith

Abstract

Subthalamic deep brain stimulation is an advanced therapy that typically improves quality of life for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the effect on caregiver burden is unclear. We recruited 64 persons with PD and their caregivers from a movement disorders clinic during the assessment of eligibility for subthalamic DBS. We used clinician-, patient- and caregiver-rated instruments to follow the patient-caregiver dyad from pre- to postoperative status, sampling repeatedly in the postoperative period to ascertain fluctuations in phenotypic variables. We employed multivariate models to identify key drivers of burden. We clustered caregiver-rated variables into 'high' and 'low' symptom groups and examined whether postoperative cluster assignment could be predicted from baseline values. Psychiatric symptoms in the postoperative period made a substantial contribution to longitudinal caregiver burden. The development of stimulation-dependent mood changes was also associated with increased burden. However, caregiver burden and caregiver-rated psychiatric symptom clusters were temporally stable and thus predicted only by their baseline values. We confirmed this finding using frequentist and Bayesian statistics, concluding that in our sample, subthalamic DBS for PD did not significantly influence caregiver burden or caregiver-rated psychiatric symptoms. Specifically, patient-caregiver dyads with high burden and high levels of psychiatric symptoms at baseline were likely to maintain this profile during follow-up. These findings support the importance of assessing caregiver burden prior to functional neurosurgery. Furthermore, they suggest that interventions addressing caregiver burden in this population should target those with greater symptomatology at baseline and may usefully prioritise psychiatric symptoms reported by the caregiver.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 33%
Unspecified 2 17%
Other 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 5 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 17%
Unspecified 2 17%
Neuroscience 2 17%
Arts and Humanities 1 8%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2019.
All research outputs
#2,240,922
of 12,952,428 outputs
Outputs from npj Parkinson's Disease
#54
of 115 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,671
of 270,065 outputs
Outputs of similar age from npj Parkinson's Disease
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,952,428 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 115 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,065 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them