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Farmácia Popular Program: changes in geographic accessibility of medicines during ten years of a medicine subsidy policy in Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#24 of 138)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Farmácia Popular Program: changes in geographic accessibility of medicines during ten years of a medicine subsidy policy in Brazil
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40545-015-0030-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isabel Cristina Martins Emmerick, José Miguel do Nascimento, Marco Aurélio Pereira, Vera Lucia Luiza, Dennis Ross-Degnan

Abstract

The Brazilian constitution guarantees the right to health, including access to medicines. In May 2004, Brazil's government announced the "Farmácia Popular" Program (FPP) as a new mechanism to improve the Brazilian population's access to medicines. Under FPP, a selected list of medicines is subsidized by the government and provided in public and private pharmacies. The aim of this study is to describe the historical stages of the FPP and to identify associated changes in the geographical accessibility of medicines through the FPP over time. It was performed documentary review and an ecological study assessing program coverage in terms of number of facilities and a FPP Pharmacy Facilities Density (PFD) index at national and regional levels from 2004 to 2013, using the FPP database. We used geographic information system mapping to depict a pharmaceutical facilities density (PFD) index at the municipality level on thematic maps. A growth of the PFD index coincident with the phases of the FPP was noticed. In the public sector, the program started in 2004; by 2006, there was a sharp increase in the numbers of participating pharmacies, stabilizing in 2009. In the private sector, the program started in 2006; by 2009 the PFD ratio had increased substantially and it continued to grow through 2011. There was an increase in FPP coverage in most regions between 2006, when the private pharmacy component started, and 2013, but participating pharmacies remain unequally distributed across geographical regions. Specifically, the wealthy areas in the South and Southeast have higher coverage, with lower coverage mostly in the North and Northeast, relatively poorer areas with greater need for access to medicines, health care, and other basic services such as potable water and sanitization. There has been a substantial increase in the number of pharmacies participating in the FPP over time. This has led to greater program coverage and has potentially improved access to FPP medicines in the country. Nevertheless, disparities in pharmacy coverage remain among the regions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 6%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Professor 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Other 8 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 29%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 18%
Social Sciences 5 15%
Unspecified 4 12%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 9%
Other 6 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2015.
All research outputs
#1,639,293
of 11,344,026 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#24
of 138 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,728
of 210,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#2
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,344,026 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 138 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,567 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.