↓ Skip to main content

Presence of novel triple mutations in the pvdhfr from Plasmodium vivax in Mangaluru city area in the southwestern coastal region of India

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Presence of novel triple mutations in the pvdhfr from Plasmodium vivax in Mangaluru city area in the southwestern coastal region of India
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2316-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shiny Joy, Susanta K. Ghosh, Rajeshwara N. Achur, D. Channe Gowda, Namita Surolia

Abstract

Genes encoding dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) are the targets of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) present in artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT; artesunate + sulfadoxine pyrimethamine) for Plasmodium falciparum. Although SP is generally not used to treat vivax infection, mutations in dhfr and dhps that confer antifolate resistance in Plasmodium vivax are common; which may be attributed to its sympatric existence with P. falciparum. Current study was aimed to determine the pattern of mutations in dhfr and dhps in P. vivax isolates from Mangaluru region. A total of 140 blood samples were collected from P. vivax-infected people attending Wenlock Hospital Mangaluru during July 2014 to January 2016. Out of 140 isolates, 25 (18%) and 50 (36%) isolates were selected randomly for sequence analysis of pvdhfr and pvdhps genes respectively. Fragment of pvdhps and full length pvdhfr were amplified, sequenced and analysed for single nucleotide polymorphisms. dhps was analysed by PCR-RFLP also, to detect the two specific mutations (A383G and A553G). Analysis of pvdhps sequences from 50 isolates revealed single and double mutants at 38 and 46% respectively. Three non-synonymous mutations (K55R, S58R and S117N) were identified for pvdhfr. Among these, K55R was detected for the first time. The current study indicates that P. vivax dhps and dhfr mutant alleles are prevalent in this area, suggesting significant SP pressure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 27%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Professor 1 7%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Unknown 5 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,729,001
of 12,818,993 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,646
of 3,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,312
of 270,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,818,993 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,765 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them