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A Kinetic Study of the Effects of Light on Circadian Rhythmicity of thefrqPromoter ofNeurospora crassa

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biological Rhythms, February 2014
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Title
A Kinetic Study of the Effects of Light on Circadian Rhythmicity of thefrqPromoter ofNeurospora crassa
Published in
Journal of Biological Rhythms, February 2014
DOI 10.1177/0748730413517981
Pubmed ID
Authors

Van D. Gooch, Alicia E. Johnson, Brian J. Bourne, Bradley T. Nix, Jonna A. Maas, Julie A. Fox, Jennifer J. Loros, Luis F. Larrondo, Jay C. Dunlap

Abstract

The role of the frq gene in the Neurospora crassa circadian rhythm has been widely studied, but technical limitations have hindered a thorough analysis of frq circadian expression waveform. Through our experiments, we have shown an improved precision in defining Neurospora's circadian rhythm kinetics using a codon optimized firefly luciferase gene reporter linked to a frq promoter. In vivo examination of this real-time reporter has allowed for a better understanding of the relationship of the light responsive elements of the frq promoter to its circadian feedback components. We provide a detailed phase response curve showing the phase shifts induced by a light pulse applied at different points of the circadian cycle. Using the frq-luc reporter, we have found that a 12-h light:12-h dark cycle (12L:12D) results in a luciferase expression waveform that is more complex and higher in amplitude than that seen in free-running conditions of constant darkness (DD). When using a lighting regime more consistent with solar timing, rather than a square wave pattern, one observes a circadian waveform that is smoother, lower in amplitude, and different in phasing. Using dim light in place of darkness in these experiments also affects the resulting waveform and phasing. Our experiments illustrate Neurospora's circadian kinetics in greater detail than previous methods, providing further insight into the complex underlying biochemical, genetic, and physiological mechanisms underpinning the circadian oscillator.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 30%
Researcher 6 26%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Professor 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 52%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 26%
Psychology 1 4%
Energy 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2014.
All research outputs
#15,745,297
of 17,814,645 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biological Rhythms
#554
of 603 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,471
of 224,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biological Rhythms
#12
of 12 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.