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A molecular survey of Australian and North American termite genera indicates that vertical inheritance is the primary force shaping termite gut microbiomes

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, February 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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66 Dimensions

Readers on

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143 Mendeley
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Title
A molecular survey of Australian and North American termite genera indicates that vertical inheritance is the primary force shaping termite gut microbiomes
Published in
Microbiome, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40168-015-0067-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nurdyana Abdul Rahman, Donovan H Parks, Dana L Willner, Anna L Engelbrektson, Shana K Goffredi, Falk Warnecke, Rudolf H Scheffrahn, Philip Hugenholtz

Abstract

Termites and their microbial gut symbionts are major recyclers of lignocellulosic biomass. This important symbiosis is obligate but relatively open and more complex in comparison to other well-known insect symbioses such as the strict vertical transmission of Buchnera in aphids. The relative roles of vertical inheritance and environmental factors such as diet in shaping the termite gut microbiome are not well understood. The gut microbiomes of 66 specimens representing seven higher and nine lower termite genera collected in Australia and North America were profiled by small subunit (SSU) rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing. These represent the first reported culture-independent gut microbiome data for three higher termite genera: Tenuirostritermes, Drepanotermes, and Gnathamitermes; and two lower termite genera: Marginitermes and Porotermes. Consistent with previous studies, bacteria comprise the largest fraction of termite gut symbionts, of which 11 phylotypes (6 Treponema, 1 Desulfarculus-like, 1 Desulfovibrio, 1 Anaerovorax-like, 1 Sporobacter-like, and 1 Pirellula-like) were widespread occurring in ≥50% of collected specimens. Archaea are generally considered to comprise only a minority of the termite gut microbiota (<3%); however, archaeal relative abundance was substantially higher and variable in a number of specimens including Macrognathotermes, Coptotermes, Schedorhinotermes, Porotermes, and Mastotermes (representing up to 54% of amplicon reads). A ciliate related to Clevelandella was detected in low abundance in Gnathamitermes indicating that protists were either reacquired after protists loss in higher termites or persisted in low numbers across this transition. Phylogenetic analyses of the bacterial communities indicate that vertical inheritance is the primary force shaping termite gut microbiota. The effect of diet is secondary and appears to influence the relative abundance, but not membership, of the gut communities. Vertical inheritance is the primary force shaping the termite gut microbiome indicating that species are successfully and faithfully passed from one generation to the next via trophallaxis or coprophagy. Changes in relative abundance can occur on shorter time scales and appear to be an adaptive mechanism for dietary fluctuations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 143 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Australia 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 133 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 27%
Researcher 24 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Master 18 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 7%
Other 27 19%
Unknown 7 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 80 56%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 19%
Environmental Science 7 5%
Chemistry 4 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 11 8%
Unknown 10 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2015.
All research outputs
#2,270,156
of 6,588,517 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#189
of 216 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,535
of 171,433 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#12
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,588,517 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 64th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 216 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.5. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 171,433 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.