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Dietary habits and Helicobacter pylori infection: a cross sectional study at a Lebanese hospital

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Gastroenterology, April 2018
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Title
Dietary habits and Helicobacter pylori infection: a cross sectional study at a Lebanese hospital
Published in
BMC Gastroenterology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12876-018-0775-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shafika Assaad, Rawan Chaaban, Fida Tannous, Christy Costanian

Abstract

To examine the association between dietary habits and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection among patients at a tertiary healthcare center in Lebanon. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 294 patients in 2016, at a hospital in Northern Lebanon. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire to collect information on socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics; dietary habits were ascertained via a short food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). H. pylori status (positive vs. negative) was determined after upper GI endoscopy where gastric biopsy specimens from the antrum, body, and fundus region were collected and then sent for pathology analysis. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to identify the association between socio-demographic, lifestyle, dietary and other health-related variables with H pylori infection. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was found to be 52.4% in this sample. Results of the multivariable analysis showed that H. pylori infection risk was higher among participants with a university education or above (OR = 2.74; CI = 1.17-6.44), those with a history of peptic ulcers (OR = 3.80; CI = 1.80-8.01), gastric adenocarcinoma (OR = 3.99; CI = 1.35-11.83) and vitamin D level below normal (OR = 29.14; CI = 11.77-72.13). In contrast, hyperglycemia was protective against H. pylori (OR = 0.18; CI = 0.03-0.89). No relationship between dietary habits and H. pylori infection was found in the adjusted analysis. Socio-demographic and clinical variables are found to be associated with H. pylori, but not with dietary factors. Further studies are needed to investigate the effect of diet on H. pylori risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 33%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 27%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2018.
All research outputs
#10,097,915
of 13,218,736 outputs
Outputs from BMC Gastroenterology
#549
of 866 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,407
of 270,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Gastroenterology
#1
of 1 outputs
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