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Impedance sensing device enables early detection of pressure ulcers in vivo

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
23 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
265 Mendeley
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Title
Impedance sensing device enables early detection of pressure ulcers in vivo
Published in
Nature Communications, March 2015
DOI 10.1038/ncomms7575
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah L. Swisher, Monica C. Lin, Amy Liao, Elisabeth J. Leeflang, Yasser Khan, Felippe J. Pavinatto, Kaylee Mann, Agne Naujokas, David Young, Shuvo Roy, Michael R. Harrison, Ana Claudia Arias, Vivek Subramanian, Michel M. Maharbiz

Abstract

When pressure is applied to a localized area of the body for an extended time, the resulting loss of blood flow and subsequent reperfusion to the tissue causes cell death and a pressure ulcer develops. Preventing pressure ulcers is challenging because the combination of pressure and time that results in tissue damage varies widely between patients, and the underlying damage is often severe by the time a surface wound becomes visible. Currently, no method exists to detect early tissue damage and enable intervention. Here we demonstrate a flexible, electronic device that non-invasively maps pressure-induced tissue damage, even when such damage cannot be visually observed. Using impedance spectroscopy across flexible electrode arrays in vivo on a rat model, we find that impedance is robustly correlated with tissue health across multiple animals and wound types. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an automated, non-invasive 'smart bandage' for early detection of pressure ulcers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 265 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
France 2 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 254 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 70 26%
Student > Master 45 17%
Researcher 27 10%
Student > Bachelor 17 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 17 6%
Other 57 22%
Unknown 32 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 127 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 5%
Materials Science 13 5%
Chemistry 10 4%
Other 37 14%
Unknown 46 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 228. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2021.
All research outputs
#85,980
of 17,154,907 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#1,219
of 33,582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,579
of 267,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#15
of 625 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,154,907 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 33,582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,542 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 625 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.