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Circadian Control Sheds Light on Fungal Bioluminescence

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, March 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

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42 Dimensions

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Title
Circadian Control Sheds Light on Fungal Bioluminescence
Published in
Current Biology, March 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2015.02.021
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anderson G. Oliveira, Cassius V. Stevani, Hans E. Waldenmaier, Vadim Viviani, Jillian M. Emerson, Jennifer J. Loros, Jay C. Dunlap

Abstract

Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ∼9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ∼100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 3%
Mexico 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 95 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 18%
Researcher 17 17%
Student > Master 10 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 6%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 8 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 17%
Chemistry 15 15%
Environmental Science 7 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 11 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 671. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2020.
All research outputs
#14,012
of 16,051,808 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#132
of 11,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#208
of 224,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#3
of 194 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,051,808 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,292 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 45.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,125 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 194 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.