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Association Between Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Overall Survival in Patients With Rectal Cancer and Pathological Complete Response After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Resection

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Oncology, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
149 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
Association Between Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Overall Survival in Patients With Rectal Cancer and Pathological Complete Response After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Resection
Published in
JAMA Oncology, July 2018
DOI 10.1001/jamaoncol.2017.5597
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fahima Dossa, Sergio A. Acuna, Aaron S. Rickles, Mariana Berho, Steven D. Wexner, Fayez A. Quereshy, Nancy N. Baxter, Sami A. Chadi

Abstract

Although American guidelines recommend use of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, individuals who achieve a pathological complete response (pCR) following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy are less likely to receive adjuvant treatment than incomplete responders. The association and resection of adjuvant chemotherapy with survival in patients with pCR is unclear. To determine whether patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who achieve pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and resection benefit from the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy. This retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study identified patients with locally advanced rectal cancer from the National Cancer Database from 2006 through 2012. We selected patients with nonmetastatic invasive rectal cancer who achieved pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and resection. We matched patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy to patients who did not receive adjuvant treatment in a 1:1 ratio. We separately matched subgroups of patients with node-positive disease before treatment and node-negative disease before treatment to investigate for effect modification by pretreatment nodal status. We compared overall survival between groups using Kaplan-Meier survival methods and Cox proportional hazards models. We identified 2455 patients (mean age, 59.5 years; 59.8% men) with rectal cancer with pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and resection. We matched 667 patients with pCR who received adjuvant chemotherapy and at least 8 weeks of follow-up after surgery to patients with pCR who did not receive adjuvant treatment. Over a median follow-up of 3.1 years (interquartile range, 1.94-4.40 years), patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy demonstrated better overall survival than those who did not receive adjuvant treatment (hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.28-0.70). When stratified by pretreatment nodal status, only those patients with pretreatment node-positive disease exhibited improved overall survival with administration of adjuvant chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.10-0.58). The administration of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer with pCR is associated with improved overall survival, particularly in patients with pretreatment node-positive disease. Although this study suggests a beneficial effect of adjuvant treatment on survival in patients with pCR, these results are limited by the presence of potential unmeasured confounding in this nonrandomized study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 149 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Student > Postgraduate 5 14%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 4 11%
Other 10 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 72%
Unspecified 6 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 102. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2019.
All research outputs
#163,112
of 13,779,248 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Oncology
#402
of 1,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,193
of 270,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Oncology
#30
of 115 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,779,248 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,855 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 85.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,467 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 115 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.