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The gender gap in science: How long until women are equally represented?

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Biology, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#9 of 4,592)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
45 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
1895 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Readers on

mendeley
333 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The gender gap in science: How long until women are equally represented?
Published in
PLoS Biology, April 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pbio.2004956
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luke Holman, Devi Stuart-Fox, Cindy E. Hauser

Abstract

Women comprise a minority of the Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Medicine (STEMM) workforce. Quantifying the gender gap may identify fields that will not reach parity without intervention, reveal underappreciated biases, and inform benchmarks for gender balance among conference speakers, editors, and hiring committees. Using the PubMed and arXiv databases, we estimated the gender of 36 million authors from >100 countries publishing in >6000 journals, covering most STEMM disciplines over the last 15 years, and made a web app allowing easy access to the data (https://lukeholman.github.io/genderGap/). Despite recent progress, the gender gap appears likely to persist for generations, particularly in surgery, computer science, physics, and maths. The gap is especially large in authorship positions associated with seniority, and prestigious journals have fewer women authors. Additionally, we estimate that men are invited by journals to submit papers at approximately double the rate of women. Wealthy countries, notably Japan, Germany, and Switzerland, had fewer women authors than poorer ones. We conclude that the STEMM gender gap will not close without further reforms in education, mentoring, and academic publishing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,895 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 333 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 333 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 64 19%
Researcher 47 14%
Student > Master 40 12%
Other 34 10%
Student > Bachelor 29 9%
Other 81 24%
Unknown 38 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 16%
Social Sciences 44 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 27 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 8%
Psychology 23 7%
Other 98 29%
Unknown 61 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1587. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2020.
All research outputs
#2,414
of 15,606,181 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Biology
#9
of 4,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87
of 278,776 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Biology
#2
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,181 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,592 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 50.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,776 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.