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General practitioners’ altered preferences for private practice vs. salaried positions: a consequence of proposed policy regulations?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, March 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
17 Mendeley
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Title
General practitioners’ altered preferences for private practice vs. salaried positions: a consequence of proposed policy regulations?
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-0777-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jon Helgheim Holte, Birgit Abelsen, Peder Andreas Halvorsen, Jan Abel Olsen

Abstract

General practitioners (GPs) in most high-income countries have a history of being independent private providers with much autonomy. While GPs remain private providers, their autonomous position appears to be challenged by increased policy regulations. This paper examines the extent to which GPs' preferences for private practice vs. salaried contracts changed in a period where a new health care reform, involving proposed increased regulations of the GPs, was introduced. We use data collected from Norwegian GPs through structured online questionnaires in December 2009 and May 2012. We find that the proportion of GPs who prefer private practice (i.e. the default contract for GPs in Norway) decreases from 52% to 36% in the period from 2009 to 2012. While 67% of the GPs who worked in private practice preferred this type of contract in 2009, the proportion had dropped by 20 percentage points in 2012. Salaried contracts are preferred by GPs who are young, work in a small municipality, have more patients listed than they prefer, work more hours per week than they prefer, have relatively low income or few patients listed. We find that GPs' preferences for private practice vs. salaried positions have changed substantially in the last few years, with a significant shift towards salaried contracts. With the proportions of GPs remaining fairly similar across private practice and salaried positions, there is an increasing discrepancy between GPs' current contract and their preferred one.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Norway 1 6%
Unknown 16 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 35%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 12%
Researcher 1 6%
Other 2 12%
Unknown 2 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 18%
Social Sciences 2 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 3 18%
Unknown 4 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2019.
All research outputs
#1,688,350
of 14,998,491 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#752
of 5,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,629
of 224,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,998,491 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,143 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,345 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them