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Effects of a health information system data quality intervention on concordance in Mozambique: time-series analyses from 2009–2012

Overview of attention for article published in Population Health Metrics, March 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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139 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of a health information system data quality intervention on concordance in Mozambique: time-series analyses from 2009–2012
Published in
Population Health Metrics, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12963-015-0043-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bradley H Wagenaar, Sarah Gimbel, Roxanne Hoek, James Pfeiffer, Cathy Michel, João Luis Manuel, Fatima Cuembelo, Titos Quembo, Pires Afonso, Victoria Porthé, Stephen Gloyd, Kenneth Sherr

Abstract

We assessed the effects of a three-year national-level, ministry-led health information system (HIS) data quality intervention and identified associated health facility factors. Monthly summary HIS data concordance between a gold standard data quality audit and routine HIS data was assessed in 26 health facilities in Sofala Province, Mozambique across four indicators (outpatient consults, institutional births, first antenatal care visits, and third dose of diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus vaccination) and five levels of health system data aggregation (daily facility paper registers, monthly paper facility reports, monthly paper district reports, monthly electronic district reports, and monthly electronic provincial reports) through retrospective yearly audits conducted July-August 2010-2013. We used mixed-effects linear models to quantify changes in data quality over time and associated health system determinants. Median concordance increased from 56.3% during the baseline period (2009-2010) to 87.5% during 2012-2013. Concordance improved by 1.0% (confidence interval [CI]: 0.60, 1.5) per month during the intervention period of 2010-2011 and 1.6% (CI: 0.89, 2.2) per month from 2011-2012. No significant improvements were observed from 2009-2010 (during baseline period) or 2012-2013. Facilities with more technical staff (aβ: 0.71; CI: 0.14, 1.3), more first antenatal care visits (aβ: 3.3; CI: 0.43, 6.2), and fewer clinic beds (aβ: -0.94; CI: -1.7, -0.20) showed more improvements. Compared to facilities with no stock-outs, facilities with five essential drugs stocked out had 51.7% (CI: -64.8 -38.6) lower data concordance. A data quality intervention was associated with significant improvements in health information system data concordance across public-sector health facilities in rural and urban Mozambique. Concordance was higher at those facilities with more human resources for health and was associated with fewer clinic-level stock-outs of essential medicines. Increased investments should be made in data audit and feedback activities alongside targeted efforts to improve HIS data in low- and middle-income countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 135 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 37 27%
Researcher 32 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 22 16%
Unknown 12 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 36 26%
Social Sciences 18 13%
Computer Science 8 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 4%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 18 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2019.
All research outputs
#2,456,330
of 14,595,679 outputs
Outputs from Population Health Metrics
#99
of 316 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,169
of 222,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Population Health Metrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,595,679 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 316 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 222,102 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them