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The spatio-temporal dynamics of deviance and target detection in the passive and active auditory oddball paradigm: a sLORETA study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, April 2018
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Title
The spatio-temporal dynamics of deviance and target detection in the passive and active auditory oddball paradigm: a sLORETA study
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12868-018-0422-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christoph Justen, Cornelia Herbert

Abstract

Numerous studies have investigated the neural underpinnings of passive and active deviance and target detection in the well-known auditory oddball paradigm by means of event-related potentials (ERPs) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The present auditory oddball study investigates the spatio-temporal dynamics of passive versus active deviance and target detection by analyzing amplitude modulations of early and late ERPs while at the same time exploring the neural sources underling this modulation with standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) . A 64-channel EEG was recorded from twelve healthy right-handed participants while listening to 'standards' and 'deviants' (500 vs. 1000 Hz pure tones) during a passive (block 1) and an active (block 2) listening condition. During passive listening, participants had to simply listen to the tones. During active listening they had to attend and press a key in response to the deviant tones. Passive and active listening elicited an N1 component, a mismatch negativity (MMN) as difference potential (whose amplitudes were temporally overlapping with the N1) and a P3 component. N1/MMN and P3 amplitudes were significantly more pronounced for deviants as compared to standards during both listening conditions. Active listening augmented P3 modulation to deviants significantly compared to passive listening, whereas deviance detection as indexed by N1/MMN modulation was unaffected by the task. During passive listening, sLORETA contrasts (deviants > standards) revealed significant activations in the right superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the lingual gyri bilaterally (N1/MMN) as well as in the left and right insulae (P3). During active listening, significant activations were found for the N1/MMN in the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and for the P3 in multiple cortical regions (e.g., precuneus). The results provide evidence for the hypothesis that passive as well as active deviance and target detection elicit cortical activations in spatially distributed brain regions and neural networks including the ventral attention network (VAN), dorsal attention network (DAN) and salience network (SN). Based on the temporal activation of the neural sources underlying ERP modulations, a neurophysiological model of passive and active deviance and target detection is proposed which can be tested in future studies.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 25%
Researcher 8 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 14%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 14 32%
Psychology 6 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 14 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2018.
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#11,406,476
of 12,829,119 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#836
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Outputs of similar age
#234,589
of 269,556 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#3
of 6 outputs
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