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Implementing knowledge into practice for improved neonatal survival; a cluster-randomised, community-based trial in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2011
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Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
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Title
Implementing knowledge into practice for improved neonatal survival; a cluster-randomised, community-based trial in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2011
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-11-239
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lars Wallin, Mats Målqvist, Nguyen T Nga, Leif Eriksson, Lars-Åke Persson, Dinh P Hoa, Tran Q Huy, Duong M Duc, Uwe Ewald

Abstract

Globally, almost 4 million newborns die during the first 4 weeks of life every year. By increased use of evidence-based knowledge in the healthcare system a large proportion of these neonatal deaths could be prevented. But there is a severe lack of knowledge on effective methods for successful implementation of evidence into practice, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Recent studies have demonstrated promising results with increased survival among both mothers and newborns using community-based approaches. In Vietnam evidence-based guidelines on reproductive health were launched in 2003 and revised in 2009. The overall objective of the current project is to evaluate if a facilitation intervention on the community level, with a problem-solving approach involving local representatives if the healthcare system and the community, results in improvements of neonatal health and survival.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 116 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 23%
Student > Master 24 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 25 20%
Unknown 15 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 18%
Social Sciences 12 10%
Psychology 7 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 5 4%
Other 15 12%
Unknown 22 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2016.
All research outputs
#6,576,799
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,191
of 4,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,286
of 95,965 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#13
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,083 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 95,965 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.