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Using motion-sensor camera technology to infer seasonal activity and thermal niche of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Thermal Biology, April 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Using motion-sensor camera technology to infer seasonal activity and thermal niche of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)
Published in
Journal of Thermal Biology, April 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.jtherbio.2015.02.009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mickey Agha, Benjamin Augustine, Jeffrey E. Lovich, David Delaney, Barry Sinervo, Mason O. Murphy, Joshua R. Ennen, Jessica R. Briggs, Robert Cooper, Steven J. Price

Abstract

Understanding the relationships between environmental variables and wildlife activity is an important part of effective management. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), an imperiled species of arid environments in the southwest US, may have increasingly restricted windows for activity due to current warming trends. In summer 2013, we deployed 48 motion sensor cameras at the entrances of tortoise burrows to investigate the effects of temperature, sex, and day of the year on the activity of desert tortoises. Using generalized estimating equations, we found that the relative probability of activity was associated with temperature (linear and quadratic), sex, and day of the year. Sex effects showed that male tortoises are generally more active than female tortoises. Temperature had a quadratic effect, indicating that tortoise activity was heightened at a range of temperatures. In addition, we found significant support for interactions between sex and day of the year, and sex and temperature as predictors of the probability of activity. Using our models, we were able to estimate air temperatures and times (days and hours) that were associated with maximum activity during the study. Because tortoise activity is constrained by environmental conditions such as temperature, it is increasingly vital to conduct studies on how tortoises vary their activity throughout the Sonoran Desert to better understand the effects of a changing climate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 6%
Botswana 1 2%
Bulgaria 1 2%
Unknown 48 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Researcher 11 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Other 4 8%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 58%
Environmental Science 12 23%
Computer Science 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2015.
All research outputs
#9,823,430
of 12,300,340 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Thermal Biology
#330
of 452 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,873
of 223,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Thermal Biology
#7
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,300,340 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 452 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,884 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.